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Sunday, 20 April 2014

Unlike Chernobyl, Fukushima was never brought under control, radiation spreads across the world - epidemiologist :From Voice of Russia

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Unlike Chernobyl, Fukushima was never brought under control, radiation spreads across the world - epidemiologist

A manager of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, Akira Ono, has admitted that the nuclear disaster handlers are not in full control of the cleanup process. Ono's announcement added to the incessant concerns that the plant's operator Tokyo Electric Power Co has been failing to tackle the numerous problems at the station. Last week, the plant saw another blunder when 203 tons of highly contaminated water were pumped into the wrong building. The Voice of Russia has asked Joseph Mangano, epidemiologist and Executive Director of Radiation and Public Health Project research group, about the risks from the Fukushima fallout. 

Earlier, TEPCO claimed that treatment of contaminated water would be finished by March 2015. Now the plant's operator makes more modest projections and describes the previous deadline as a "tough goal". The Japanese government has been providing TEPCO with funds and equipment, but the company still remains under fire for the way it is handling the consequences of the 2011 nuclear disaster.  
A manager of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant, Akira Ono, admitted that the nuclear disaster handlers are not in full control of the cleanup process. And actually, it seems that we've been hearing this many times now over the years. Is this anything and what do you make of that statement coming from Akira Ono? Does this perhaps show that the Japanese are now being more frank about the situation at hand?
That is the new part that the truth is starting to come out. But people have known from the beginning that this not only was a huge disaster, but that it was never brought under control, compared to Chernobyl, which was the other major nuclear accident, which was brought control – it was buried and put under a sarcophagus within several months. This is different. This is over three years later. Radiation is still leaking into the air and it is still leaking into the Pacific Ocean and not in small amounts, but in very-very large amounts.
We’ve been hearing about how bad this is and how this is getting into the Pacifi Ocean, and how it is going to contaminate the oceans and the fish, and the risks to the residents and people who actually don't live even near to the Fukushima disaster's site. But could they really have done much more than they have done? That's the question that really seems to be pertinent, because we hear a lot about this and we hear the international community saying that it is being poorly handled. But no one else has really gotten involved in it. What more could have been done?
That's a great question. And I honestly don't have an answer. Maybe TEPCO and the Japanese government have done all they could. I think the key point here is that nuclear reactors are capable of terrible-terrible disasters such as this, which may not be controlled. And the real unfortunate part is that people suffer, people get sick, people die when they are exposed to these very dangerous chemicals.
How many more nuclear plants do we have in sites that have high seismic activity?
Too many. I don't know the exact number, but even if it is one, that is too many.

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