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Tuesday, 11 March 2014

Finally!.. After 2 years of positioning for the right Publisher, Christopher Nolands "3.11: Surviving Japan" has finally found a home and is now availiable :)



http://vimeo.com/ondemand/311survivingjapan

Inside story of 2011 Japanese Tsunami relief & Fukushima nuclear disaster. A critical look at how the authorities handled the nuclear crisis and Tsunami relief by an American who volunteered in the clean-up. It is in short, a documentary of the devastating events in Japan and 6 months of the after-math that followed. It features true stories from those affected by the disaster, the government and even TEPCO. It highlights the struggle in dealing with: The Tsunami clean-up, Government response to the disaster, radiation plus the future of nuclear power after the accident.

Reviews and Ranking

Enjoy!
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I encourage all to see this movie.

10/10
Author: aural-martin from Seattle, WA
22 July 2012
*** This review may contain spoilers ***
I am very sad that this happened. My heart goes out to all of those who are still in need, and those who lost loved ones. This movie should be an eye opener to all of us, and I encourage all to learn from this and make changes. We can see what can happen in a major disaster. we should be thinking about our families.Are we aware of our surroundings were we live or work? and what could happen. learn from our ancestors or indigenous tribes who know the land. Don't be fooled that modern society can fix everything, and will take care of you if you are in need. This taught me to be better prepared or have a plan in place for my family. I hope everyone who watches this do the same.Great movie go and see it.
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2 out of 2 people found the following review useful:

Incredible, beautiful, and absolutely stunning

10/10
Author: Pia Christina Jensen from Costa Rica
28 July 2012
This creative venture driven by Christopher Noland's heartfelt desire to do something for Japan's people is a must see documentary.

From beginning to end, I was gripped by this story. Everything Chris and his interviewees show us is both heartbreaking and infuriating. I am deeply moved by the plight of Japan and this production captures well why I am so moved. The opening music, the panoramas, the people, the devastation, the ongoing critical issues with the nuclear power plants and the dire conditions which Japan's government and TEPCO have left people in as portrayed in the film, leaves me feeling hopeful. Hopeful because people like Chris care enough to show the world the truth of what is going on. And, it leaves me wondering, what next, Japan?

I highly recommend you see this film with friends and family. Be prepared to be shocked.
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1 out of 1 people found the following review useful:

From the Pacific Coast

10/10
Author: gailmorehouse from United States
28 July 2012
*** This review may contain spoilers ***
The creation process of "Surviving Japan" was fascinating to watch in itself. Chris Nolan was still volunteering on the clean-up and reconstruction project in Japan when he recognized that events were not being fully covered by news outlets. Without real-time footage, the world could not imagine the vastness of destruction or the plight of a people who desperately required assistance from the global community.

This is not just a Japan problem. The tell-tale signs of devastation have begun depositing unprecedented debris on our beaches, raising awareness and forming questions for Pacific Coast residents from California to Alaska. The Pacific Islands, Mexico and Canada are also vulnerable.

"Surviving Japan" is a must see for everyone: for those who wish to help survivors and those who are concerned for their own well-being with respect to radiation exposure at home.
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Important movie (only movie?) for learning about Fukushima disaster

9/10
Author: Nick Thabit from United States
12 March 2013
Chris Noland brings us into the lives and emotions of Japanese affected by the tsunami, earthquake and nuclear disaster that has profoundly hurt Japan since March 2011. He had the foresight to film a lot of his aid work to the displaced residents, and does a good job of recounting the nuclear accidents, which are now looking to be a good deal worse than Chernobyl. I've been following Mr. Oyama's articles for some time, this is the first I've seen of him speaking live, and it's devastating. In a sense, this movie will never be finished and I wouldn't be surprised if this turns out to be the first in a number of installments.

Give this movie a chance, you won't come away untouched.
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A powerful message for all Japanese and civilized nations

10/10
Author: Takahiro Katsumi from Tokyo, Japan
12 March 2013
*** This review may contain spoilers ***
This is not a political film with the purpose to criticize the establishment for its misconduct. It is now only a given that critical information were withheld from the public for maximizing political and economic interests. This movie does not delve into unveiling these in detail. Instead, it digs deep into the psyche of the people in the affected region and reveals the true nature of their suffering; how they're surviving the aftermath of a natural and man-made disaster of catastrophic proportions.

For the affected people, nothing IS over. Their suffering is still an ongoing fact and little has been resolved or redeemed. They are all struggling to live strong, but with destruction of communities and dysfunctional support from local and central government, they cannot continue to stand strong alone. Director Noland portrays these sufferings by showing his own experiences as one of the affected people and an active volunteer aid worker. His journey to making this film began with a series of questions that still remain fully unanswered. One of the most revealing fact of his journey was that their suffering has not ended despite his own efforts, despite the communal, local, national, and international efforts. Their sufferings are that enormous, and deep. And this is masterfully reflected in Yoko Ono's special song "Kurushii" ('95) used in this film.

For any Japanese, a film created from an experience of a foreigner who has helped the Japanese people with such dedication has a powerful message. For any national of a civilized nation, the messages of the common affected people will have strong impact in reflecting what one's community, local governments and central government can do in critical situations that involve vested interests. It is easy to imagine that if it was not for the nuclear power interests, the level of suffering experienced by the affected people would have been drastically different
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