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Friday, 2 August 2013

Local governments ignore cesium detection in Tokyo river eels

The Edogawa river serves as the boundary between Tokyo and Chiba Prefecture. (Asahi Shimbun file photo)
The Edogawa river serves as the boundary between Tokyo and Chiba Prefecture. (Asahi Shimbun file photo)






















[snip]

JAEA president resigns over insufficient safety at Monju reactor

May 17, 2013

By YUSUKE FUKUI/ Staff Writer
Tokyo and Chiba local governments took no action for nearly two months after being informed that radioactive cesium had been detected in eels caught in a boundary river between the two prefectures.

Officials of both governments said no independent study was conducted because the eels were not caught by professional fishermen intending to sell the catch.

The detection of the cesium was also not publicized.

On March 9, a 47-year-old self-employed woman caught an eel from the Edogawa river in Tokyo's Katsushika Ward. Concerned about reports that cesium had accumulated downstream in the river, she sent the eel to Hideo Yamazaki, a professor of environmental analysis at Kinki University in Osaka Prefecture. Using a germanium semiconductor detector, Yamazaki found that the eel had 147.5 becquerels of radioactive cesium per kilogram, higher than the central government standard of 100 becquerels.

Yamazaki reported his finding to the Fisheries Agency in late March because he felt there was a need for an official investigation to back up his finding as well as further studies to look into the effects on other fish.

[end snip]

Yes, IGNORE.....
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