Thursday, 16 June 2016

Fukushima radiation spikes 7,000% as contaminated water pours into the ocean

[snip]

Cleanup crews trying to mitigate Japan’s never-ending radiation crisis at Fukushima ran into more problems recently after sensors monitoring a drainage gutter detected a huge spike in radiation levels from wastewater pouring into the Pacific Ocean.

The Tokyo Electric Power Company says radiation levels were up to 70 times, or 7,000 percent, higher than normal, prompting an immediate shutdown of the drainage instrument.



The first readings came around 10 a.m. local time on February 22, setting off alarms not once but twice as radiation levels spiked to extremely high levels.

“The levels of beta ray-emitting substances, such as strontium-90, measured 5,050 to 7,230 becquerels per liter of water between 10:20 a.m. and 10:50 a.m.,” reported The Japan Times. “TEPCO requires radioactivity levels of groundwater at the plant discharged into the sea to remain below 5 becquerels.”

TEPCO shut off leaky gutter, but radiation continued to spike throughout day

The gutter was quickly decommissioned to prevent further radiation emissions, but the leaks reportedly continued throughout the day, with radiation levels hovering between 10 and 20 times higher than normal. TEPCO says it doesn’t know what caused the sudden radiation spikes.

“With emergency surveys of the plant and monitoring of other sensors, we have no reason to believe tanks storing radioactive waste water have leaked,” stated a plant official to the media. “We have shut the gutter [from pouring water to the bay]. We are currently monitoring the sensors at the gutter and seeing the trend.”

[end snip]

FULL ARTICLE

http://checkoutthehealthyworld.com/fukushima-radiation-spikes-7000-contaminated-water-pours-ocean/

Tuesday, 7 June 2016

Possible Causes Of Fukushima Frozen Wall Failures



[snip]

June 1st, 2016 

TEPCO reported last week that roughly 10% of the frozen wall is not working. Currently only certain sections are being actively frozen with other sections to possibly be frozen as they determine the cause and effect of the initial work.

One of the sections being frozen with some problems is near unit 1 on the sea side. TEPCO claimed that accumulated groundwater and gravel in the area may be contributing to the problem. TEPCO also indicated the wall is “riddled with holes”. These problems appear to be delaying the start for freezing of other sections of the wall. One action being considered is to put cement or other solidification agents in the problem areas. We  looked at these problem areas and what factors may be playing a role.

[end snip]

FULL ARTICLE AND DIAGRAMS

Friday, 29 April 2016

Have you seen images from Japan showing mountains of black bags filled with radioactive soil? You probably wondered what they are going to do with them, right?



Have you seen images from Japan showing mountains of black bags filled with radioactive soil? You probably wondered what they are going to do with them, right? The bags only last for a few years, and in fact, I've seen pictures of bags already broken with weeds sticking out from them.
Well, the mystery is solved. The government changed the law in secret meetings so that the radioactive waste is no longer radioactive. They raised the safety level from 100 becquerel per kg to 8000 becquerel per kg.
According to the secret meetings, the formerly radioactive material will be now safely used as construction material across the nation.
Now I wonder what they will do with the radio active water stored in already leaking giant tanks around the nuclear plants. They are right by the Pacific Ocean.
By the way, for those who can not grasp what all this oddity means, the simple way to understand is that instead of coming up with safe ways to take care of dangerous radioactive materials, the Japanese government decided to work with media and industry to make money off of people's health. It is more profitable to spread radiation across Japan than taking care of people's lives. And that way, those who take care of people's health can make money too.
But if they are dead or surrounded by radiation everywhere, how do they appreciate money? I really think this whole capitalism thing is a huge fucking bullshit.
Japan to Recycle Waste Collected during Fukushima Decontamination:
http://www.laht.com/article.asp…
一億総被ばくの国家プロジェクト… 8,000ベクレル/kg以下の除染土を 全国の公共事業に!?: https://foejapan.wordpress.com/2016/04/15/8000bq_problem/
汚染土壌の再生利用は世界に前例の無い一大ナショナル・プロジェクト:http://oshidori-makoken.com/?p=2059

Saturday, 2 April 2016

Japan to Recycle Waste Collected during Fukushima Decontamination - as building material

[snip]

TOKYO – The Japanese government announced Wednesday it will recycle the material collected during the decontamination of the Fukushima nuclear plant for construction purposes if radiation levels are found to be sufficiently low.

The government plans to store the waste collected from the radiation-affected region and use it as construction material in places outside the prefecture in northeastern Japan, within 30 years, reported state broadcaster NHK.

According to the country’s environment ministry, residue showing less than 8,000 becquerel per kg could be used in future to pave roads, build anti-tsunami walls and in other public works.

Over 90 percent of the material, accumulated since the 2011 disaster, could be re-used if the contaminated elements are removed, according to the authorities, who are, however, yet to develop the technology to separate waste with high radiation levels.

[end snip]

more:
http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=2408901&CategoryId=12395

Tuesday, 22 March 2016

Radioactivity in the Ocean: Diluted, But Far from Harmless







[snip]

by Christina MacPherson 

Environment 360 7 April 2011 

With contaminated water from Japan’s crippled Fukushima nuclear complex continuing to pour into the Pacific, scientists are concerned about how that radioactivity might affect marine life. Although the ocean’s capacity to dilute radiation is huge, signs are that nuclear isotopes are already moving up the local food chain. by Elizabeth Grossman Over the past half-century, the world has seen its share of incidents in which radioactive material has been dumped or discharged into the oceans. A British nuclear fuels plant has repeatedly released radioactive waste into the Irish Sea, a French nuclear reprocessing plant has discharged similar waste into the English Channel, and for decades the Soviets dumped large quantities of radioactive material into the Arctic Ocean, Kara Sea, and Barents Sea. That radioactive material included reactors from at least 16 Soviet nuclear-powered submarines and icebreakers, and large amounts of liquid and solid nuclear waste from USSR military bases and weapons plants.

Still, the world has never quite seen an event like the one unfolding now off the coast of eastern Japan, in which thousands of tons of radioactively contaminated water from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant are pouring directly into the ocean. And though the vastness of the ocean has the capacity to dilute nuclear contamination, signs of spreading radioactive material are being found off Japan, including the discovery of elevated concentrations of radioactive cesium and iodine in small fish several dozen miles south of Fukushima, and high levels of radioactivity in seawater 25 miles offshore.

How this continuing contamination will affect marine life, or humans, is still unclear. But scientists agree that the governments of Japan, the United States, and other nations on the Pacific Rim need to ramp up studies of how far this contamination might spread and in what concentrations.

“Given that the Fukushima nuclear power plant is on the ocean, and with leaks and runoff directly to the ocean, the impacts on the ocean will exceed those of Chernobyl, which was hundreds of miles from any sea,” said Ken Buesseler, senior scientist in marine chemistry at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts. “My biggest concern is the lack of information. We still don’t know the whole range of radioactive compounds that have been released into the ocean, nor do we know their distribution. We have a few data points from the Japanese — all close to the coast — but to understand the full impact, including for fisheries, we need broader surveys and scientific study of the area.”

Buessler and other experts say this much is clear: Both short-lived radioactive elements, such as iodine-131, and longer-lived elements — such as cesium-137, with a half-life of 30 years — can be absorbed by phytoplankton, zooplankton, kelp, and other marine life and then be transmitted up the food chain, to fish, marine mammals, and humans. Other radioactive elements — including plutonium, which has been detected outside the Fukushima plant — also pose a threat to marine life. A key question is how concentrated will the radioactive contamination be. Japanese officials hope that a temporary fishing ban off the northeastern Japanese coast will be enough to avert any danger to human health until the flow of radioactive water into the sea can be stopped.......

[end snip]


FULL ARTICLE
[link to nuclear-news.net] 
http://nuclear-news.net/2016/03/23/radioactivity-in-the-ocean-diluted-but-far-from-harmless/

Sunday, 13 March 2016

FUKUSHIMA : A Nuclear Story: free documentary (shot between 2011-2015) in-depth exclusive interview with ex-Prime Minister Naoto Kan




link to www.nuclearstory.com
 www.nuclearstory.com


"A powerful documentary – shot from March 11th, 2011 through March 2015 – that sheds some light on what really happened at the Fukushima nuclear power plant after the 2011 earthquake and the tsunami that followed.


Open publication - Free publishing

An exclusive journey of four years inside the triple tragedy which hit Japan on March 11, 2011, following Italian Sky News reporter Pio d’Emilia who has lived in Japan for more than thirty years. Pio was in Tokyo the day of the earthquake. After travelling across all the municipalities hit by the tsunami and after illegally entering the so-called “exclusion zone” already established but loosely enforced by the government he actually reaches the gate of the nuclear plant. He would not be allowed inside the plant though: to do this, he had to wait until June 2013 when Tepco, the plant operator, allows the first pool of foreign journalists in.

In his quest to unfold Fukushima’s still on-going nuclear disaster, he collected over 300 hours of footage consisting of shocking images and interviews with local people, local authorities and officers, focusing on what he calls the social “collateral effects” of past and present decisions by the government and the nuclear community. An in-depth exclusive interview on what really happened at Fukushima with ex-Prime Minister Naoto Kan eventually tells us how Tokyo – and probably Japan – was saved from a much greater catastrophe by chance"

Friday, 11 March 2016

To Build a Robot to go, Where No Robot Has Gone Before (without dying)

One of many trial Robot Designs. So far, everyone has failed.

Re: Fukushima 5 Year Anniversary Today

If robots are still dying from radiation, what do you expect for people, nay-sayers?

[snip]

The robots sent into Fukushima have 'died'
Not good...
BEC CREW 11 MAR 2016

The remote-controlled robots that were sent into the site of the 2011 meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan have reportedly 'died', thanks to incredibly high amounts of leaked radiation destroying their wiring.

The robots - which take years to manufacture - were designed to swim through the underwater tunnels of the now-defunct cooling pools, and remove hundreds of extremely dangerous blobs of melted fuel rods. But it looks like that’s not going to happen any time soon.

...

Five years on, and researchers from the Tokyo Electric Power Company (Tepco) - the Japanese utility that maintains the site - still can’t figure out how to clean up the highly dangerous radioactive water and melted fuel rods that remain on the site.

"Efforts to clean up Fukushima, which is considered the largest nuclear disaster since the Chernobyl accident in 1986, are under continued scrutiny after a series of blunders and Tepco's admission that efforts in the short term to contain contamination may take as long as 30-40 years," Peter Dockrill reported for us back in January, when the robots were first deployed.

It’s estimated that the team has so far only addressed 10 percent of the mess left behind by the meltdowns, and the pressure to get a move-on is certainly not going to go away any time soon, with news last December that the damaged plant is continuing to leak small amounts of radiation into the Pacific Ocean. Radioactive material has even been showing up on the west coast of the US.

One approach Tepco has taken is to build the world’s biggest 'ice wall' around the plant to stop the nearby groundwater being contaminated, but that’s yet to be completed, and it only stems the damage - it doesn’t clean up the mess that’s still sitting in there. 

"It is extremely difficult to access the inside of the nuclear plant," Naohiro Masuda, Tepco's head of decommissioning, told Reuters. "The biggest obstacle is the radiation."

"The reactors continue to bleed radiation into the ground water and thence into the Pacific Ocean," added Artie Gunderson, a former nuclear engineer who is not involved in the project. "When Tepco finally stops the groundwater, that will be the end of the beginning."

...

Reactor 3, which is where our poor, recently deceased robots had been sent, contains far higher levels of radiation, and humans can’t get near it. It’s estimated that there are 566 fuel-rod assemblies that need to be removed from just this one reactor.

"The fuel rods melted through their containment vessels in the reactors, and no one knows exactly where they are now," Reuters reports.

As soon as the robots got close to the reactors, the radiation destroyed their wiring and rendered them useless, causing long delays, Masuda told the press organisation, adding that because each robot has to be custom-built for each building, it takes two years to develop every single one.

...

It’s not yet clear if better, stronger robots are the answer to cleaning up the Reactor 3 building, it could be that the technology to build robots that are resistant to such high levels of radiation doesn’t actually exist, and the Tepco researchers will have to come up with some other solution. 

What we do know is this problem isn’t going away any time soon, and if leakages occur, it will affect us all, so all we can do is hope that the science will come through. In the meantime, you can watch the robots below - in happier times before they were destroyed - and marvel at how freaking cool they once were:

[end snip]

FULL ARTICLE
[link to www.sciencealert.com] 

Fukushima 5 Year Anniversary Today


  • Has anything been fixed? no
  • Have they come up with any robots or decontamination devices in 5 years? no
  • Has the radiation decreased? no
  • Are people still living there? yes
  • Have they come up with a definable "clean up plan"? no
  • The news today has already started with these sad facts as their headline.....
  • 80% of radiation went into the Pacific Ocean.....

Today my thoughts are with the children, born and unborn that are stuck there, living there and growing up there....

Say No to Nuke

Thursday, 10 March 2016

The ashes of half a dozen unidentified laborers ended up at a Buddhist temple in this town just north of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant.

[snip]

Fukushima 'Decontamination Troops' Often Exploited, Shunned

The ashes of half a dozen unidentified laborers ended up at a Buddhist temple in this town just north of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant. Some of the dead men had no papers, others left no emergency contacts. Their names could not be confirmed and no family members had been tracked down to claim their remains.
They were simply labeled "decontamination troops" — unknown soldiers in Japan's massive cleanup campaign to make Fukushima livable again five years after radiation poisoned the fertile countryside.
The men were among the 26,000 workers — many in their 50s and 60s from the margins of society with no special skills or close family ties — tasked with removing the contaminated topsoil and stuffing it into tens of thousands of black bags lining the fields and roads. They wipe off roofs, clean out gutters and chop down trees in a seemingly endless routine.
Coming from across Japan to do a dirty, risky and undesirable job, the workers make up the very bottom of the nation's murky, caste-like subcontractor system long criticized for labor violations. Vulnerable to exploitation and shunned by local residents, they typically work on three-to-six-month contracts with little or no benefits, living in makeshift company barracks. And the government is not even making sure that their radiation levels are individually tested.
"They're cleaning up radiation in Fukushima, doing sometimes unsafe work, and yet they can't be proud of what they do or even considered legitimate workers," said Mitsuo Nakamura, a former day laborer who now heads a citizens' group supporting decontamination laborers. "They are exploited by the vested interests that have grown in the massive project."
Residents of still partly deserted towns such as Minamisoma, where 8,000 laborers are based, worry that neighborhoods have turned into workers' ghettos with deteriorating safety. Police data shows arrests among laborers since 2011 have climbed steadily from just one to 210 last year, including a dozen yakuza, or gangsters, police official Katsuhiko Ishida told a prefectural assembly. Residents are spooked by rumors that some laborers sport tattoos linked with yakuza, and by reports that a suspect in serial killings arrested in Osaka last year had worked in the area.
...
Most of the men work for small subcontractors that are many layers beneath the few giants at the top of the construction food chain. Major projects such as this one are divided up among contractors, which then subcontract jobs to smaller outfits, some of which have dubious records.
The Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare examined more than 300 companies doing Fukushima decontamination work and found that nearly 70 committed violations in the first half of last year, including underpayment of wages and overtime and failure to do compulsory radiation checks. Those companies were randomly chosen among thousands believed to be working in the area.
"Violations are so widespread in this multilayer subcontract system. It's like a whack-a-mole situation," said Mitsuaki Karino, a city assemblyman in Iwaki, a Fukushima city where his civil group has helped workers with complaints about employers.
Karino said workers are sometimes charged for meals or housing they were told would be free, he said, and if they lose jobs or contracts aren't renewed, some go homeless.
"It's a serious concern, particularly for workers who don't have families or lost ties with them," he said.
...
"That's how the construction industry has long operated. In order to accomplish decontamination, we need to rely on the practice," said Tadashi Mouri, a health and labor ministry official in charge of nuclear workers' health. He said the ministry has instructed top contractors to improve oversight of subcontractors.
Several arrests have been made in recent months over alleged labor violations.
A complaint filed by a worker with labor officials led to the October arrest of a construction company president who had allegedly dispatched workers to Fukushima under misleading circumstances. The investigation found that the worker had been offered pay of 17,000 yen ($150) per day, but after middlemen took a cut he was getting only 8,000 yen ($70).
In another case, a supervisor and a crane operator were arrested in July for alleged illegal dumping of radiated plant debris in Minamisoma. Five companies heading the project were suspended for six weeks.
Most workers keep their mouths shut for fear of losing their jobs. One laborer in a gray jacket and baggy pants, carrying cans of beer on his way home, said he was instructed never to talk to reporters.
A 62-year-old seasonal worker, Munenori Kagaya, said he had trouble finding jobs after he and his fellow workers fought for and won unpaid daily "danger" allowance of 10,000 yen ($88) for work in Tamura city in 2012.
Officials keep close tabs on journalists. Minutes after chatting with some workers in Minamisoma, Associated Press journalists received a call from a city official warning them not to talk to decontamination crews.
Beyond the work's arduous nature, the men also face radiation exposure risks. Inhaling radioactive particles could trigger lung cancer, said Junji Kato, a doctor who provides health checks for some workers.
Although most laborers working in residential areas use protective gear properly, others in remote areas are not monitored closely, according to workers and Nakamura, the leader of the radiation workers support group. Many are not given compulsory training or education about dealing with radiation, he said.

 [end snip]


Tuesday, 8 March 2016

The Fukushima Cleanup Will Take Generations NOT 40 Years






[snip]

The Tōhoku tsunami of March 11, 2011, triggered a series of equipment failures leading to multiple meltdowns, explosions, and releases of radioactive material at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company. Five years after the second-worst nuclear accident in history (after Chernobyl), the cleanup team is still struggling to halt the buildup of contaminated water, and the techniques and equipment needed to locate, extract, and dispose of the melted fuel have yet to be developed. Given these challenges, many experts are convinced that the decommissioning process will take far longer than the official 40-year timetable—perhaps as long as a century.
[end snip]
http://www.nippon.com/en/in-depth/a05202/?pnum=1

Sunday, 6 March 2016

There was a fire at the temporary storage of waste from decontamination in Namie , Fukushima Prefecture, for about 5 hours.

video



[snip]

TV Asahi (ANN)  March 5th (Sat) 17:47 delivery

 There is a fire in the temporary storage of waste out with decontamination in Fukushima Prefecture Namie, they were burning dead branches and dried grass for about 5 hours.  And depends on the police, too 5:00 the morning 10, he came out on fire in the temporary storage of waste out with decontamination in Cakra Namie. In burned to the dead branches and dead grass that came out in the decontamination, it is that had been stacked on site before packed in a bag.Until it is extinguished took about five hours, but the injured did not have.Although the field was the decontamination work at that time, that it did not work to use the fire, we determine the cause of the police fire.

http://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/videonews/ann?a=20160305-00000034-ann-soci

Saturday, 20 February 2016

No bliss in this ignorance: the great Fukushima nuclear cover-up

Extracts from "The Ecologist"
Linda Pentz Gunter  20th February 2016


The Japanese were kept in the dark from the start of the Fukushima disaster about high radiation levels and their dangers to health, writes Linda Pentz Gunter. In order to proclaim the Fukushima area 'safe', the Government increased exposure limits to twenty times the international norm. Soon, many Fukushima refugees will be forced to return home to endure damaging levels of radiation.


Dr. Tetsunari Iida is the founder and executive director of the Institute for Sustainable Energy Policies (ISEP) in Japan.
As such, one might have expected a recent presentation he gave in the UK within the hallowed halls of the House of Commons, to have focused on Japan's capacity to replace the electricity once generated by its now mainly shuttered nuclear power plants, with renewable energy.....
....
A trial for Tepco like post-war Tokyo Trials
The media may have played the willing government handmaiden in reassuring the public with falsehoods, but in July 2012, the Fukushima Nuclear Accident Independent Investigation Commission concluded that the disaster was really no accident but "man-made". It came about, the researchers said, as a result of "collusion" between the government, regulators and the nuclear industry, in this case, Tepco.
"There should be a Tepco trial like the post-war Tokyo Trials", Iida said, referring to the post World War II war crimes trial in which 28 Japanese were tried, seven of whom were subsequently executed by hanging.
....
Normalizing radiation, a policy and now a practice
Of course radiological decontamination is not that easy. Nor is it reliable. It is more like"pushing contamination from one spot to the next", as independent nuclear expert, Mycle Schneider describes it. And radiation does not remain obediently in one place, either.
"The mountains and forests that cannot even be vaguely decontaminated, will serve as a permanent source of new contamination, each rainfall washing out radiation and bringing it down from the mountains to the flat lands", Schneider explained. Birds move around. Animals eat and excrete radioactive plant life. Radiation gets swept out to sea. It is a cycle with no end.
....
The nuclear industry did not tell the public the truth
The confusion surrounding evacuation was so profound that, as Zhang et al. noted in a September 11, 2014 study published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health"Unclear evacuation instructions caused numerous residents to flee to the northwestern zone where radiation levels were even higher."
All par for the course, said Iida. "I must emphasize, the people in the nuclear industry did not tell the public the truth and keep us informed."
....
The great repatriation lie
All of this set the perfect stage for the Great Repatriation Lie. "It's the big cover-up," Iida told his Westminster audience. "People are being told it's quite safe to have a little [radiation] exposure."
Indeed, at a recent conferences of prefectural governors, young people in particular were urged to return to Fukushima. "If you come to live with us in Fukushima and work there, that will facilitate its post-disaster reconstruction and help you lead a meaningful life",said Fukushima Gov. Masao Uchibori.
Young people in Japan, however, appear not to be cooperating. Where evacuees are returning, the majority are senior citizens, who have less to lose from a health perspectiveand are more traditionally tied to the land and their ancestral burial grounds.
....
Radioactive areas are hardest hit economically
Late last year, the Asahi Shimbun looked at tax revenues in the 42 municipalities affected by the triple 2011 disasters of earthquake, tsunami and the Fukushima meltdowns.
Unsurprisingly, the areas hardest hit by radiological contamination had suffered the biggest economic blows. Those areas free from radioactive fallout could simply rebuild after the tsunami and earthquake, and had consequently recovered economically, some even to better than pre-3/11 levels.
"On the other end of the scale, Namie, Fukushima Prefecture, marked the biggest decreasing rate - 72.9 percent - in tax revenues for fiscal 2014", the Asahi Shimbunreported"All residents of the town near the crippled nuclear plant remain in evacuation. Although tax payments from companies increased from decontamination work and other public works projects, income taxes paid by residents and fixed asset taxes have declined."

[Linda Pentz Gunter is the international specialist at Beyond Nuclear, a Takoma Park, MD environmental advocacy group.]

[END SNIPS]

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE

BREAKING! South Australia just broke news it is considering building a waste dump for Asia's spent nuke fuel rods!!


Just in and released on normal news channels as if it was par for the course.....

[snip]

Nuclear winner: The case for South Australia storing nuclear waste


Arguments in favour of nuclear waste storage in South Australia should not be so easily dismissed. There are valid economic and moral arguments made in the Royal Commission's interim report, writes Mike Steketee.

It may be the ultimate NIMBY proposal: Australia taking the world's nuclear waste, or at least a good chunk of it, and burying it deep in the South Australian outback.

Surely you would have to be out of your mind, as a government or a voter, to volunteer for such a project?

Would you feel better if we were paid for it? How about $5 billion a year over 30 years and $2 billion a year for the following 40 years? They are the figures mentioned in the "tentative findings" issued this week by South Australia's Nuclear Fuel Cycle Royal Commission headed by former governor Kevin Scarce.

Many would respond that no amount of money would be worth it. But as well as the economic case outlined in the report, there is a moral argument, which goes like this. We have the world's largest known uranium resources and are the world's third largest producer (after Kazakhstan and Canada) of uranium for nuclear reactors (but hopefully not for nuclear weapons, although the strict safeguards on which we insist are no guarantee).

The waste from nuclear fuel from our uranium, together with that from other producers, is piling up around the world in temporary storages. Some of it is very long-lived and very dangerous.

If reprocessed, it can be turned into nuclear weapons. A less complex option is to use radioactive material to make a dirty bomb. In the age of terrorism, that is a real concern.

So far not a single country has built a permanent facility to safely dispose of the waste, although two - Sweden and Finland - have ones underway. Australia has some of the most stable geological formations in the world in outback South Australia, Western Australia and the Northern Territory.

That is, the earth has not moved in these regions for millions of years. They are arid and flat, meaning there also has been no groundwater movement. And they are very sparsely populated.

You can argue that countries that opt for nuclear power should bear the responsibility for dealing with the consequences, including waste. Like earthquake-prone Japan? Or Pakistan, where terrorists run riot? The nuclear waste lying around in temporary facilities is a threat to the world, including Australia.

[end snip]

[link to www.abc.net.au]
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-19/steketee-nuclear-winner:-the-case-for-storing-nuclear-waste/7184650
________________________________________________________

South Australia ponders nuclear waste options

The initial findings of a royal commission into the merits of South Australia becoming a hub for uranium mining and waste storage raised as many questions as they answered.


Adjusting his luminous orange tie, royal commissioner Kevin Scarce took a deep breath and stepped up to the podium. Framed by the enormous pipe organ that looms over the marble-pillared auditorium of Adelaide Town Hall, the 63-year-old former South Australian governor was on stage to preach the Good News, but as he was no doubt well aware, the 500-odd congregation assembled below were of decidedly mixed faith.

“I know this is an emotive issue for many people,” he said, “but I ask that we respect one another.”

Just how ambitious that request was became clear when Scarce put forward a premise even more audacious than his necktie – that South Australia’s seemingly hopeless descent into economic oblivion could be reversed by importing 138,000 tonnes of high-level nuclear waste from all over the world, reaping $445 billion in profits over 120 years.

Cue the incredulous guffaws, the cries of indignation, and the gradual tightening of Scarce’s jaw. It was going to be a long week.

The initial findings of the royal commission indicate that for an outlay of $145 billion, South Australia could set itself up to take 13 per cent of the world’s high-level nuclear waste.
Monday night in Adelaide was just the first of four presentations of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Royal Commission’s initial findings, a whistlestop tour of South Australia that culminated on Thursday in Mount Gambier.

The royal commission’s brief was to examine the feasibility of South Australia mining more uranium, processing it, using it for nuclear energy and then storing the waste – turning the state into a value-adding, vertically integrated hub of radioactivity.

The initial findings, based on interviews with 128 witnesses and more than 250 submissions, will be out for public comment for a five-week period before informing a final report due on May 6.

What the royal commission’s expert panel determined was that there is potential to expand mining, but little scope for processing in an already oversupplied market, and insufficient electricity demand in South Australia for nuclear energy at present.

Where an opportunity was identified, however, was within the casks of hazardous nuclear waste accumulating in the temporary storage sites of countries where nuclear power is up and running.

Scarce pointed to Finland and Sweden, where massive underground storage facilities are set to hold the respective country’s radioactive leftovers.

“South Australia offers a unique combination of attributes well suited to being able to do this safely,” he said.

“Stable geology, relatively low levels of seismic activity across large parts of the state, the arid environment, a stable economic and political structure, and pre-existing sophisticated frameworks for securing long-term agreements.”

The only thing lacking is the high-level radioactive material to store in the first place – domestically, Australia produces low- and mid-level waste mostly related to nuclear medicine, for which the federal government is seeking a storage site in a separate process.

The initial findings of the royal commission indicate that for an outlay of $145 billion, South Australia could set itself up to take 13 per cent of the world’s high-level nuclear waste, generating 1500 jobs during a construction period of 25 years and a further 600 jobs in operation.

By offering a waste storage solution, the initial findings indicated South Australia could potentially find more customers for its uranium via fuel-leasing mechanisms – a kind of yellowcake rental service, where countries take Australian uranium and as part of the deal Australia manages the spent fuel.

Scandinavia did not just serve as a model for how to store the waste, but also in how to make money out of it.

Just as Norway established a lucrative sovereign wealth fund from its oil resources, the royal commission has proposed a similar scheme that grows out of the profits to be gleaned from becoming a global nuclear repository.

Scarce urged attendees in Adelaide to contemplate the state’s future, but when question time arrived, the locals appeared to be thinking further ahead than he had in mind.

[end snip]

[link to www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au (secure)]
https://www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au/news/politics/2016/02/20/south-australia-ponders-nuclear-waste-options/14558868002910
___________________________________________________

#NuclearCommissionSAust Ethics – an oxymoron – theme for this week

ethics-nuclearThere’ s nothing ethical about pleasing a few greedy entrepreneurs that think they can make a fortune out of introducing Small Nuclear Reactors to Australia – as the follow-up to South Australia taking in global radioactive trash.

There’s nothing ethical about the lie that taking in global radioactive trash will solve South Australia’s unemployment problem .

There’s nothing ethical about planning to saddle South Australia with the biggest white elephant and stranded asset in human history. A radioactive trash dump makes no money. (That’s why no other country wants to do this)

I could imagine one scenario in which taking in radioactive trash might be ethical. Imagine if one country – for example, Japan, decided to completely shut down all nuclear activities, and had trouble organising a waste repository. A global good citizen, such as Australia, might help them out in this.

But there’s no global citizenship in the Royal Commission plan. It’s not only about greed: it’s also about keeping the toxic global nuclear industry going, at a time when it is pretty much in terminal decline.

February 20, 2016 Posted by Christina MacPherson |

Next steps in the push for South Australia as world’s nuclear toilet
scrutiny-Royal-Commission CHAINFriends of the Earth 20 Feb 16 The ‘Tentative Findings’ report is posted at: [link to nuclearrc.sa.gov.au]

The deadline for written submissions responding to the interim report is March 18 (see the Royal Commission website for details).

The final report will be published in May 2016. [link to www.foe.org.au]

9 News 19 Feb 16 The report is due on May 6 and the state government will not make any decisions before the end of the year.

That could include putting the issue to a referendum at the next state election, due in 2018

February 20, 2016 Posted by Christina MacPherson |

[end snip]


[link to antinuclear.net]
http://antinuclear.net/2016/02/20/nuclearcommissionsaust-ethics-an-oxymoron-theme-for-this-week/
http://antinuclear.net/2016/02/20/nuclear-news-to-20-february/
_________________________________________________________


MY NOTE:

This is the fastest i've ever seen them release news like this as if they have already decided.....
It's life as we know it, but only just. 

Friday, 5 February 2016

Japanese government to ease radioactive waste rules

[snip]

TOKYO - Japan's Environment Ministry has formulated draft rules allowing local governments to store designated waste contaminated with radioactive substances from the nuclear crisis at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant at separate locations under certain criteria.

 Debate on how to dispose of such waste was at a standstill, but the draft rules are expected to move the issue a step forward. The rules also allow local governments to lift designations on radioactive waste at their own discretion, if radioactive levels drop below government standards.

 According to the draft rules, the government will maintain its basic policy that Tochigi, Chiba, Ibaraki, Miyagi and Gunma prefectures, which have huge amounts of designated waste, should consolidate and store the waste at one location within each prefecture. But the rules will also allow designated waste in which the density level of radioactive substances has dropped, or is expected to drop in the near future, to be stored at separate locations, depending on conditions.

 The draft rules also stipulate that the Environment Ministry and local governments will jointly deliberate on whether to lift the designation on waste in which the level of radioactivity has fallen below the standards. They also say the costs of disposing of waste that has been removed from the category of designated waste will be covered by the central government.

 At present, 12 prefectures, including Fukushima, Tochigi and Chiba, hold a total of 170,000 tons of designated waste.

[end snip]

http://www.chicagotribune.com/sns-wp-japan-nuclear-a83ad2f4-cb52-11e5-ae11-57b6aeab993f-20160204-story.html

Tuesday, 5 January 2016

Japan Finally Admits The Truth: “Right Now, We Have An Emergency At Fukushima”

[snip]

Tyler Durden's picture



Tepco is struggling to contain the highly radioactive water that is seeping into the ocean near Fukushima. The head of Japan's NRA, Shinji Kinjo exclaimed, "right now, we have an emergency," as he noted the contaminated groundwater has breached an underground barrier and is rising toward the surface - exceeding the limits of radioactive discharge. In a rather outspoken comment for the typically stoic Japanese, Kinjo said Tepco's "sense of crisis was weak," adding that "this is why you can't just leave it up to Tepco alone" to grapple with the ongoing disaster. As Reuters notes, Tepco has been accused of covering up shortcomings and has been lambasted for its ineptness in the response and while the company says it is taking actions to contain the leaks, Kinjo fears if the water reaches the surface "it would flow extremely fast," with some suggesting as little as three weeks until this critical point.
Highly radioactive water seeping into the ocean from Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant is creating an "emergency" that the operator is struggling to contain, an official from the country's nuclear watchdog said on Monday.

This contaminated groundwater has breached an underground barrier, is rising toward the surface and is exceeding legal limits of radioactive discharge, Shinji Kinjo, head of a Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) task force, told Reuters.

[end snip]


FULL ARTICLE: 

Japan’s Fukushima Prefecture Shows Wave of Mutations NSMBC


[snip]



Christof Lehmann (nsnbc) : Japanese researchers are reluctant to comment, but more than 90 percent of fir trees in forests close to the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) show signs of mutations and abnormalities while plant lice species sampled in a town more than 30 kilometers from the disaster site either have deformed legs or are missing legs. The mutations are a probable precursor of what is in store for Japanese people who are being resettled in allegedly de-contaminated towns and villages.


Japanese scientists are reluctant to comment on the record. Several attempts by nsnbc to reach out resulted in off-protocol confirmations of suspicions and references to Japanese law that makes revealing of unauthorized information about the Fukushima disaster a criminal offense that can be punishable with up to ten years in prison.



The official line is that Japanese scientists are trying to figure out whether there is a causal relation between the wave of mutations and the still ongoing release of radiation and radionucleides into the environment. Studies focus primarily on hos radioactive cesium spread in forests and forest soil after the catastrophic triple meltdown at the TEPCO operated Fukushima Daiichi NPP after it was struck by an earthquake and a subsequent tsunami in 2011.




Results of a 2013 study already revealed that levels of the radioactive isotope cesium from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi power plant in northern Japanese forests had almost doubled within one year and that it will continue increasing as the forests bioaccumulate the isotope. The 2013 study and ongoing studies have major ramifications even though these studies largely ignore a cohort of other, potentially more dangerous isotopes such as plutonium.


The wave of mutations in insects, fir trees and other animals is according to Japanese experts who are relutant to speak on the record a precursor for what populations who live within a 100 km radius of the crippled power-plant can expect to see in human populations. The Japanese government’s push for resettling populations that were evacuated to so-called de-contaminated villages and towns is particularly problematic and controversial.




[end snip]




READ MORE:
http://nsnbc.me/2015/12/30/japans-fukushima-prefecture-shows-wave-of-mutations/

Wednesday, 30 December 2015

Government data shows U.S. being bombarded with Fukushima radiation 1,000 times higher than normal


[snip]

Government data shows that the U.S. is being bombarded with Fukushima radiation 1,000 times higher than normal.

In the months following the 2011 meltdowns at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, residents of Los Angeles were being exposed to levels of dangerous alpha radiation nearly 1,000 times above normal levels, a government study found.

The data came from a July 2012 presentation at the National Conference on Radiation Control. The presentation was given by Joji Ortego, Principal Radiation Protection Specialist for Los Angeles County Radiation Management.

Following the Fukushima meltdowns, Los Angeles county heard many concerns from residents about the potential health impacts of radiation crossing the Pacific Ocean from the disaster. So they commissioned a study of radiation levels in the area. The report notes that federal agencies delayed in providing information to the county, and that the state Radiologic Health Branch was unable to provide inspectors due to budget constraints. The state lab was unable to provide a reasonable turnaround time for sample analysis, so the county instead hired a local radiation monitor manufacturer for the analysis.

Radiation levels exceed federal thresholds

Samples were taken between April 29 and May 2, 2011, approximately seven weeks after the radioactive releases from Fukushima. The county found that gross alpha radiation levels at a location in Los Angeles were 300 femtocuries per cubic meter (fCi/m3), and levels at a Hacienda Heights location were 200 fCi/m3.


Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/052291_Fukushima_California_radiation.html#ixzz3vn9ahWOq

Fukushima Today : by Robert Hunziker



Extract from 
http://www.counterpunch.org/2015/12/29/fukushima-today/


[snip]

Throughout the world, the name Fukushima has become synonymous with nuclear disaster and running for the hills. Yet, Fukushima may be one of the least understood disasters in modern times, as nobody knows how to fix neither the problem nor the true dimension of the damage. Thus, Fukushima is in uncharted territory, a total nuclear meltdown that dances to its own rhythm. Similar to an overly concerned parent, TEPCO merely monitors but makes big mistakes along the way.
Over time, bits and pieces of information about Fukushima Prefecture come to surface. For example, Arkadiusz Podniesinski, the noted documentary photographer of Chernobyl, recently visited Fukushima. His photos and commentary depict a scenario of ruination and anxiety, a sense of hopelessness for the future.
Ominously, the broken down Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant looms in the background of everybody’s life, like the seemingly indestructible iconic image of destruction itself, Godzilla with its signature “atomic breath.”
Podniesinski’s commentary clearly identifies the blame for the nuclear accident, namely: “It is not earthquakes or tsunami that are to blame for the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, but humans. The report produced by the Japanese parliamentary committee investigating the disaster leaves no doubt about this. The disaster could have been foreseen and prevented. As in the Chernobyl case, it was a human, not technology, that was mainly responsible for the disaster,” Photographer and Filmmaker Arkadiusz Podniesinski Visits Fukushima, Axis of Logic, Dec. 27, 2015.
Four years after the fact, more than 120,000 residents are not able to return home. Radiation zones have been established with the color red demarcating the highest levels of radioactive contamination, the Red Zone, meaning > 50 mSv/y. There is no decontamination work in Red Zones. It is unlikely that residents will ever return, although the Abe government claims otherwise.
Radiation is accumulative. As a general rule, a person can only survive for one hour with exposure of 1 Sv/hour or 1,000 mSv/hour. The recommended lifetime human dosage of radiation should be less than 500 mSv. A chest x-ray produces 0.10 mSv. The standard limit for nuclear workers worldwide is 20 mSv/year (Source: Radiation Survival Cheat Sheet). However, Fukushima, because of the emergency, allows workers to receive up to 100-mSv exposure before they must leave the site
Within Fukushima, Orange Zones are designated as less contaminated but still uninhabitable because radiation levels run 20-50 mSv/y, but decontamination work is underway. Residents are allowed to visit homes for short duration only during the daytime. However, as it happens, very few people are seen. Most of the former residents do not want to go back and the wooden houses in many of the towns and villages are severely dilapidated.
[end snip]
FULL ARTICLE: