Friday, 18 April 2014

WIPP Update: — Robots Brought To Site For Radiation Levels Too High For Humans

Fukushima Emergency what can we do?: WIPP Update: — Robots Brought To Site For Radiatio...: Today Is April 18th, 1014 Time: 12:39 Hrs. PDT [snip] It's Official Now. WIPP Contaminated. ENENEWS: HEADLINES: AP: Crews Retrea...

WIPP Update: — Robots Brought To Site For Radiation Levels Too High For Humans — ‘Significant Amount Of Information’ Will Be Revealed To Public In Next Few Days.



Today Is April 18th, 1014 Time: 12:39 Hrs. PDT

[snip]

It's Official Now. WIPP Contaminated.
ENENEWS: HEADLINES: AP: Crews Retreat After Nuclear Material Found At WIPP — Officials: Correct To Turn Back, Contamination Was Increasing — Robots Brought To Site For Radiation Levels Too High For Humans — ‘Significant Amount Of Information’ Will Be Revealed To Public In Next Few Days.

(VIDEOS)
From AP:
AP, Apr. 17, 2014: Crews On Their Fourth Trip Into The Mine On Wednesday Made It Into The Only Active Waste Storage Area And Found Contamination, [Tammy Reynolds, U.S. Dept. Of Energy’s Deputy Recovery Manager] Said. The Deeper They Went Into The Area, The More Widespread The Contamination, She Said. But The Crews Had To Retreat Before Identifying The Possible Source Because They Had Been Underground For Five Hours In Protective Gear That Retains Heat And The Batteries On Their Respiratory Equipment Were Running Low. The Next Step Is For Crews, And Possibly Robots, To Go Back Down To See If They Can Identify What Caused The Leak.

[end snip]

VIDEO Here: KRQE News: [link to up.anv.bz]
http://up.anv.bz/latest/anvload.html?key=eyJtIjoiTElOIiwicCI6ImRlZmF1bHQiLCJ2IjoiMjU4ODQ0In0=


Estimated radiation doses of Fukushima returnees withheld for half a year

[snip]

April 16, 2014

THE ASAHI SHIMBUN
The government withheld findings on estimated radiation exposure for Fukushima returnees for six months, even though levels exceeded the long-term target of 1 millisievert a year at more than half of surveyed locations.

Individual radiation doses were estimated to be beyond 1 millisievert per year, or 0.23 microsievert an hour, at 24 of all the 43 surveyed sites, including ones in the Miyakoji district in Tamura, Fukushima Prefecture, The Asahi Shimbun learned April 15.

The revelation comes just two weeks after the central government lifted the evacuation order for the district on April 1.

...

The government’s decontamination work aims at bringing radiation levels in contaminated areas to within 20 millisieverts a year before it gives the go-ahead for residents to return.

It also intends to bring readings to 1 millisievert or less eventually. The International Commission on Radiological Protection says a reading of up to 20 millisieverts is acceptable in areas where cleanup is under way.

The central government has also proposed to distribute devices that measure individual radiation to returned evacuees, so residents can monitor their radiation doses on their own. [you can trust those...]

But some evacuees from areas affected by the Fukushima No. 1 plant nuclear accident, which was triggered by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami disaster, worry about the possibility they may be exposed to high radiation doses after returning to their homes. [oh really?]

...

In mid-October, the two agencies compiled a midterm report and submitted it to the government. But the Cabinet Office’s working team did not disclose the report until the evacuation order for the Miyakoji district was lifted. According to a member of the team, this was because the finding “has no direct relationship with lifting the evacuation orders.” [yeah, right]

Although the government held numerous meetings with Miyakoji residents to discuss lifting the evacuation order, it never presented the survey results, nor did it even refer to the existence of the data.

The government only presented an outline of the results to the three municipalities earlier in April.

Asked to disclose the findings, the government released the survey results to The Asahi Shimbun and posted the midterm report on the website of the industry ministry.

The working team said it planned to reveal the survey’s findings and analysis of the data on April 18 after fine-tuning its final report. But the team changed its mind because The Asahi Shimbun’s request to disclose the findings made it realize that public interest in the survey was greater than expected.

(This article was written by Shinichi Sekine and Miki Aoki.)

THE ASAHI SHIMBUN

Thursday, 17 April 2014

Manager at Japan's Fukushima plant admits radioactive water 'embarrassing'

[snip]


OKUMA, Japan Thu Apr 17, 2014 10:24pm BST
Naomi Hirose, president of Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Tepco), which operates the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, bows before delivering his speech at an annual conference of the Japan Atomic Industry Forum (JAIF), an organisation made up of all major nuclear reactor makers and utilities, in Tokyo April 15, 2014. REUTERS-Issei Kato
1 OF 2. Naomi Hirose, president of Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Tepco), which operates the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, bows before delivering his speech at an annual conference of the Japan Atomic Industry Forum (JAIF), an organisation made up of all major nuclear reactor makers and utilities, in Tokyo April 15, 2014.
CREDIT: REUTERS/ISSEI KATO






(Reuters) - The manager of the Fukushima nuclear power plant admits to embarrassment that repeated efforts have failed to bring under control the problem of radioactive water, eight months after Japan's prime minister told the world the matter was resolved.
...
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's government pledged half a billion dollars last year to tackle the issue, but progress has been limited.
"It's embarrassing to admit, but there are certain parts of the site where we don't have full control," Akira Ono told reporters touring the plant this week.
He was referring to the latest blunder at the plant: channelling contaminated water to the wrong building.
...
"But we were pressed to build tanks in a rush and may have not paid enough attention to quality. We need to improve quality from here."
The Fukushima Daiichi station, 220 km (130 miles) northeast of Tokyo, suffered triple nuclear meltdowns in the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl in 1986.
...
this is predicated on the state-of-art ALPS (Advanced Liquid Processing System) project, which removes the most dangerous nucleides, becoming fully operational. The system has functioned only during periodic tests.
As Ono spoke, workers in white protective suits and masks were building new giant tanks to contain the contaminated water - on land that was once covered in trees and grass.
A cluster of cherry trees, unmoved since the disaster, is in bloom amid the bustle of trucks and tractors at work as 1,000 tanks in place approach capacity. Pipes in black insulation lie on a hill pending installation for funnelling water to the sea.
HUGE FLUSH
"We need to improve the quality of the tanks and other facilities so that they can survive for the next 30-40 years of our decommission period," Ono said, a stark acknowledgement that the problem is long-term.
Last September, Abe told Olympic dignitaries in Buenos Aires in an address that helped Tokyo win the 2020 Games: "Let me assure you the situation is under control."
Tepco had pledged to have treated all contaminated water by March 2015, but said this week that was a "tough goal."
...
In a rare success, the government won approval from fishermen for plans to divert into the sea a quarter of the 400 tonnes of groundwater pouring into the plant each day.
But things keep going wrong.
Last week, Tepco said it had directed 203 tonnes of highly radioactive water to the wrong building, flooding its basement. Tepco is also investigating a leak into the ground a few days earlier from a plastic container used to store rainwater.
...
A hangar-like structure houses Toshiba Corp's ALPS system, able to remove all nucleides except for less noxious tritium, found at most nuclear power stations, its planners say.
It sat idle for 19 months after a series of glitches. The latest miscue occurred on Wednesday, when a tonne of radioactive water overflowed from a tank.
....
The 1,000 tanks hold 440,000 tonnes of contaminated water. Some 4,500 to 5,000 workers, about 1,500 more than a half year ago, are trying to double the capacity by 2016.
Once the deal was clinched with the fishermen, Tepco embarked on a plan to use a water bypass, from as early as next month, to funnel clean groundwater to the sea.
But the latest samples next to the bypass found elevated levels of radiation and the project was placed under further scrutiny. Tepco said the radiation was within permitted limits.

[end snip]

Embarrasing?...
:WTF:

Full article:

Fukushima I NPP: Highly Contaminated Water from Turbine Buildings Routed to Wrong Buildings, and the Reason May Not Be What You Think: was it sabotage?

[snip]
This must also be an innocent mistake by an inexperienced worker who has been sent to Fukushima I NPP by a yakuza head-hunter and is being exploited by the subcontractor but who happens to know exactly what switches to flip to turn on the pumps that should not be on.

[end snip]

The important thing to remember that this fiasco and on going disaster would be the easiest terrorist act on a nuke plant....

Read the full report here:
In fact, one of the long-time workers who tweet from Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant, "Sunny", seems to suspect a 'foul play'. When I first read the...
EX-SKF.BLOGSPOT.COM

Tuesday, 15 April 2014

67% of Japanese say NO to Nukes... now I read this piece of BS Propoganda about rallies to get the restarts underway... WTF.....


Yukio Nakano, 55, a nearby resident and conservationist, walks along the beach next to the Kyushu Electric Power Co.'s Sendai nuclear power plant in Satsumasendai, Kagoshima Prefecture, on April 5. | REUTERS

[snip]

In test of post-Fukushima policy, town rallies for restart of reactors
BY MARI SAITO
REUTERS
APR 14, 2014

SATSUMASENDAI, KAGOSHIMA PREF. – On the main road leading from the Sendai nuclear plant in Kagoshima Prefecture, a construction crew is laying down asphalt to widen the evacuation route in the event of a future disaster.

For many living in the area, that’s a hopeful sight. It means the authorities are edging closer to restarting two nuclear reactors that have been an economic engine for nearly three decades in a remote coastal town that has few other options.

Satsumasendai never felt the earthquake that triggered the Fukushima nuclear disaster some 1,600 km (almost 1,000 miles) to the north in March 2011. But residents saw their friends lose jobs and felt their future was threatened when the Sendai nuclear plant, run by Kyushu Electric Power, was idled along with the rest of the nation’s reactors for a more stringent round of safety checks after Fukushima.

“I know it was a horrible accident, but right now I’m more concerned about the economy and my job,” said Hiroya Komatsu, 28. “We saw it on TV, but it could very well have been the Philippines. It didn’t feel like it was Japan.”

Like Komatsu, many living in Satsumasendai support a pronuclear mayor who remains hopeful that a now-shelved plan to build a third reactor may some day be revived.

The Sendai plant has been fast-tracked for a safety review by the Nuclear Regulation Authority and could come back online as early as August.

Proponents hope Satsumasendai will be a test case for a nationwide effort to bring other nuclear plants back onto the grid in coming months.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government last week approved a long-delayed energy policy statement that describes nuclear power — which once generated 30 percent of the nation’s power — as a key energy source.

All 48 of Japan’s reactors are shut down. Analysts see a good chance to bring at least 14 back online in a review process that begins with Satsumasendai, a town with a population of about 100,000.

A quick restart there will be good news for Kyushu Electric, which is seeking a $1 billion capital infusion from the government-run Development Bank of Japan.

[end snip]

[link to www.japantimes.co.jp]
http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2014/04/14/national/in-test-of-post-fukushima-policy-town-rallies-for-restart-of-reactors/#.U00uw9IW3nN


My reply:

citizenperth • 2 minutes ago

Hold on, this is waiting to be approved by The Japan Times Online.

That must be the biggest peice of propganda i have read to date ... 67% of Honorable Japanese say no to Nuclear..... Find them jobs installing Solar and other technologies that we already know work....


(I bet they don't OK that one)

TEPCO under-calculated radiation exposure for 142 Fukushima workers

[snip]

The central operating control room of the No. 1 and No. 2 reactors is opened to the media by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi power plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture (AFP Photo / Pool / Koji Sasahara)

Published time: March 27, 2014 01:51

Tokyo Electric Power Co. underestimated internal radiation exposure of 142 workers involved in immediate emergency operations at the damaged Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant in March 2011, according to Japan’s Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry.

After reexamining exposure records provided by TEPCO, the Ministry said Tuesday it had increased the 142 workers’ radiation data by an average of 5.86 millisieverts, The Asahi Shimbun reported.

The Ministry said one male employee was exposed to 180 millisieverts. He was initially reported to have been exposed to around 90 millisieverts.

Two other workers were exposed to radiation of 50 to less than 100 millisieverts, the Ministry found.

According to the International Commission on Radiological Protection a person should be exposed to no more than one millisievert per year from all sources of radiation, though it says only doses of more than 100 millisieverts are associated with a higher risk of cancer.

[end snip]

http://rt.com/news/tepco-radiation-workers-exposure-501/

Sunday, 13 April 2014

Japan to restart 3/4 reactors

Japan in Depth / Govt energy plan offers no N-power details

The Yomiuri Shimbun

Ichiro Marutani and Hiroshi Tajima / Yomiuri Shimbun Staff WritersThe basic energy plan approved by the Cabinet on Friday did not present numerical targets on the future proportions of electricity sources such as nuclear power and renewable energy, while stipulating a policy to reactivate idle nuclear reactors.
The plan did not rule out the possibility of constructing new nuclear power plants and reactors.
The latest basic plan regards nuclear power plants as “an important base load power source” and presented a policy to restart nuclear reactors. But it did not include figures that specified how much electricity should come from nuclear power generation.

Why is no one watching? Japanese Doctors Officially Link Higher Cancer Rates to Fukushima Radiation

Fukushima Emergency what can we do?: Japanese Doctors Officially Link Higher Cancer Rat...: [snip] Cancer rates in many areas of Japan are on the rise following the global catastrophe at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear powe...

Japanese Doctors Officially Link Higher Cancer Rates to Fukushima Radiation

[snip]

fukumeter
Cancer rates in many areas of Japan are on the rise following the global catastrophe at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power facility back in March 2011. And some Japanese doctors now caring for all those radiation refugees who were shipped out from areas surrounding the nuclear plant after it exploded say fallout from the disaster is likely to blame for this massive uptick in disease. Image of a radiation meter detecting radiation 20 meters from Fukushima. Credit: raneko
The German media group Deutsche Welle (DW) reports that many radiation refugees are having to watch as their family members and pets suffer gruesome fates at the hands of what appears to be radiation poisoning. One elderly woman told reporters that her dog lost all the hair around his neck, his skin turned black, and he eventually died, all signs that suggest a link to radiation.
Many people are also suffering, as evidenced by tests revealing an increase in thyroid damage among folks who lived in close proximity to the plant. One local doctor from Namie, a town located about 5.6 miles (9 km) from the Fukushima plant, has been examining patients ever since the disaster and is convinced that Fukushima radiation is causing a major public health crisis.
[end snip]
Why is no one watching?